SQL Tutorial

SQL Tutorial SQL Introduction SQL Syntax SQL Data Types SQL OPERATORS SQL COMMANDS SQL Queries What are single row and multiple row subqueries?

SQL Database

SQL Create Database SQL DROP Database SQL SELECT Database

SQL Table

SQL TABLE SQL CREATE TABLE SQL COPY TABLE SQL ALTER TABLE SQL DELETE SQL TRUNCATE TABLE SQL DROP TABLE SQL UPDATE TABLE SQL INSERT TABLE

SQL SELECT

SQL SELECT Statement SQL SELECT WHERE Clause SQL SELECT IN Operator SQL BETWEEN Operator SQL SELECT BETWEEN Operator SQL SELECT AND Operator SQL SELECT OR Operator SQL SELECT LIKE Operator SQL SELECT DISTINCT SQL SELECT SUM SQL SELECT MAX SQL SELECT MIN SQL SELECT AVG

SQL Clause

SQL WHERE Clause SQL GROUP BY CLAUSE SQL ORDER BY Clause SQL HAVING Clause

SQL INSERT

SQL INSERT Statement SQL INSERT INTO Statement SQL INSERT INTO Values SQL INSERT INTO SELECT SQL Insert multiple rows

SQL JOIN

SQL JOIN SQL Inner Join SQL Left Join SQL Right Join SQL Full Join SQL CROSS Join

SQL OPERATOR

SQL Comparison SQL LOGICAL Operator SQL Cast Operator SQL Arithmetic

Difference

SQL vs NOSQL WHERE vs HAVING DELETE vs DROP GROUP BY vs ORDER BY DROP vs TRUNCATE SQL IN vs SQL EXISTS Difference between Delete, Drop and Truncate in SQL

MISC

SQL SubQuery SQL CASE Commit and Rollback in SQL Pattern Matching in SQL DDL Commands in SQL DML Commands in SQL Types of SQL Commands SQL COUNT SQL Primary Key SQL FOREIGN KEY SET Operators in SQL Check Constraint in SQL SQL EXCEPT SQL VIEW SQL WHERE Statement SQL CRUD Operation Where Condition in SQL TCL Commands in SQL Types of SQL JOINS SQL Nth Highest Salary SQL NOT OPERATOR SQL UNION ALL SQL INTERSECT SQL Data Definition Language SQL Data Manipulation Language SQL Data Control Language SQL CONSTRAINTS SQL Aggregate Operators SQL KEYS Codd’s Rules in SQL What is SQL Injection? Trigger In SQL SQL WHERE Multiple Conditions Truncate function in SQL SQL Formatter WEB SQL SQL Auto Increment Save Point in SQL space() function in SQL SQL Aggregate Functions SQL Topological Sorting SQL Injection SQL Cloning Tables SQL Aliases SQL Handling Duplicate Update Query in SQL Grant Command in SQL SQL SET Keyword SQL Order BY LIMIT SQL Order BY RANDOM

How To

How to use the BETWEEN operator in SQL How To Use INNER JOIN In SQL How to use LIKE in SQL How to use HAVING Clause in SQL How to use GROUP BY Clause in SQL How To Remove Duplicates In SQL How To Delete A Row In SQL How to add column in table in SQL ? How to drop a column in SQL? How to create a database in SQL? How to use COUNT in SQL? How to Create Temporary Table in SQL? How to Add Foreign Key in SQL? How to Add Comments in SQL? How To Use Group By Clause In SQL How To Use Having Clause In SQL How To Delete Column In Table How To Compare Date In SQL How index works in SQL How to calculate age from Date of Birth in SQL How to Rename Column name in SQL

SQL Order BY LIMIT

SQL is a common computer language used to handle relational databases. It has been around for decades and is the most widely used language for interacting with databases. The capacity to get data from a database and arrange it based on certain criteria is one of the most important components of SQL.

The ORDER BY and LIMIT clauses are two crucial SQL features that aid in the organisation and management of data extraction from a database. In this post, we'll look at some of these two clauses and see how they work.

In SQL, the ORDER BY phrase can be used to arrange data in a table depending on one or more columns. Sorting could be done either ascending or descending. The sorting order is ascending by default, but it may be altered to descendant by using the DESC keyword. The following is the syntax for the ORDER BY clause:

Syntax:

SELECT column1, column2, column3
FROM table_name
ORDER BY column_name ASC/DESC;

Columns 1, 2, and 3 are the columns we wish to extract from table name, and column name is the column on which the sorting must be executed. The ASC/DESC keyword can be used to determine the sorting order.

The LIMIT clause in SQL is used to restrict the number of rows returned from a table. To extract a fixed amount of rows after sorting the data, the LIMIT clause is frequently used in combination with the ORDER BY clause. The LIMIT clause has the following syntax:

Syntax:

SELECT column1, column2, column3
FROM table_name
ORDER BY column_name
LIMIT number_of_rows;

The number of rows parameter specifies the number of rows to fetch from the table.

Consider the following situation to better understand how the ORDER BY and LIMIT clauses work:

Consider the table "employees," which holds information about a company's employees. The columns in the table are as follows:

id, name, age, salary, department

Assume we want to find the top ten employees in the organisation with the highest salaries. We may accomplish this by running the SQL query:

Program Code:

SELECT name, salary
FROM employees
ORDER BY salary DESC
LIMIT 10;

The query extracts the name and salary fields from the workers table, arranges the data in decreasing order based on the salary column, and returns just the top ten rows.

It is worth mentioning that not all relational databases support the LIMIT clause. The analogous clause in Microsoft SQL Server, for example, is named TOP, and the syntax is somewhat different. The similar phrase in Oracle is named ROWNUM, and the syntax is different. As a result, before using the LIMIT clause, be sure to read the documentation for the database you're using.

Sorting data in increasing order by a specified column is a typical use case for the ORDER BY clause. For instance, if we wish to extract the names of all employees in the "employees" database, ordered by age in ascending order, we may use the query:

Program Code:

SELECT name, age
FROM employees
ORDER BY age ASC;

Output:

SQL ORDER BY LIMIT

Another use is sorting data by many columns. For example, if we wish to extract the names and salaries of all workers in the "employees" database, ordered by department in increasing order and then followed by salary in descending order, we may use the following query:

Program Code:

SELECT name, salary, department
FROM employees
ORDER BY department ASC, salary DESC;

Output:

SQL ORDER BY LIMIT

The LIMIT clause may also be used to obtain a certain range of rows from a table. For instance, if we wish to extract the names and salaries of the second through fifth best paid employees in the "employees" database, we may use the following query:

Program Code:

SELECT name, salary
FROM employees
ORDER BY salary DESC
LIMIT 1, 4;

Output:

SQL ORDER BY LIMIT

The first parameter in the LIMIT clause, 1, indicates the first row to be retrieved, and the second value, 4, specifies the number of rows to return.

This indicates that the query will return four rows, beginning with the employee with the second-highest salary.

It's worth noting that the ORDER BY clause may be used in subqueries as well. For instance, if we wish to find out who the highest-paid person in each department is, we may perform the following query:

Program Code:


SELECT name, salary, department
FROM employees
WHERE (department, salary) IN (SELECT department, MAX(salary)
                                FROM employees
                                GROUP BY department)
ORDER BY department;

Output:

SQL ORDER BY LIMIT

The subquery returns the department as well as the employee with the highest salary within every department, while the main query returns the name, salary, and department of an employee with the highest salary within every department. The results are then ranked in ascending order by department.

Conclusion:

Finally, the ORDER BY LIMIT clauses in SQL are key aspects that aid in accessing and arranging data from a database.

The ORDER BY phrase can be used to sort data based on certain criteria, while the LIMIT clause can be used to restrict the number of rows returned from a table.

Understanding these clauses and their usage is a necessary step in comprehending SQL.